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Devices!

 

The use of electronics to record teachers, staff or students in any format including audio recording, video recording, still photography etc. without written consent of all parties involved is prohibited. Posting recordings in any public forum, internet or otherwise, without written consent of all individuals involved is also prohibited.

 

 

The school is not responsible for any loss, theft, or damage to any cell phone, smart phone, iPod, iPad, tablet device, and/or any handheld electronic device, laptop computer, or any other personal electronic device that students may bring to school. It is the responsibility of students’ to keep electronic devices secure during the school day or when they are on campus.

 

Electronics Policy

At Vine Hill School electronic devices may be used only for academic purposes and exclusively by permission of the teacher.  

We recognize that cell phones and other electronic devices have become a common tool for communication.  However, they have also become a major distraction to the learning environment, pose a risk to the safety of the user and nearby peers, and are vulnerable to theft.  

 

We ask that you allow your child to carry a cell phone only if absolutely necessary.

 

Parental PermissionIf a student carries a cell phone the phone must be turned off and stored out of sight during school hours.  Phones may not be used to talk, take pictures, play games, record or text during school hours, including recesses.  

 

 

What happens if the rules aren't followed?

Rules

1st infraction - students will have their cell phone taken away and returned at the end of the day.

 

2nd infraction - students will have their cell phone taken and secured in the office until a parent can come to school to retrieve it.

 

3rd infraction - students will no longer be allowed to bring a cell phone to school until a parent conference with the principal is held.

A little background...

Technology provides our children opportunities to share, engage, and connect in an exciting and different way, and at the same time has the potential to threaten their emotional innocence and physical safety. It can be useful to reflect on the now-universal technology of television and movies for some digital content parallels when defining appropriate use of the current web-enabled devices (phones, tablets, music players, watches, etc.), which our children are becoming familiar with at an increasingly early age. In 1968 the formation of the film rating system began and children were rightfully identified as not being emotionally developed to a point that allowed them to decipher and filter this new visual stimulation on their own. From this early work to protect the innocence of our youth, an industry standard rating system evolved to what we are now all familiar with ("Rated G, PG, PG-13, R, NC-17, Unrated, Mature, etc.). The rating system effectively shifted the burden of identifying age-appropriate material to the producers of the content, instead of the parents quickly reaching for the television knob to change the channel or physically diverting their child's eyes, which obviously assumes that parents are always physically present to achieve these interventions.

 

The internet today, and the devices that access it, do not default to an age-appropriate, filtered version of the content because an industry standard does not exist, however; children, physiologically, are no more emotionally developed today than nearly 50 years ago when video ratings were established. Technology is everywhere and will continue to play a central role in each of our children's social, educational, and professional lives. It has become important for schools to collaborate with parents to teach children life-long skills of how to interact with technology in a healthy manner and to implement campus-wide policies that proactively manage, and greatly reduce the risk of any child being negatively exposed to inappropriate content.

 

Cell phones have become a necessity for adults, an expected part of life now it seems with most teens, and increasingly tweens.  If we take the stance that these devices are necessary for our elementary age students for a multitude of reasons,  we may be placing adult "needs" and responsibilities on our children at a too young age, one that they are not fully ready to understand and process.  Yes, most of our children can operate devices of a variety of design and purpose (they are the "swipe" generation, they don't know what life without the iPad even means).  However, the school day should be a time when children can and should be learning communication, social, and academic skills beyond electronics. Our youngest children do not need the pressure, burden, and responsibility that comes with communication online.  While ultimately it is the parents' choice as to whether their individual children will have access to these devices, it is the responsibility of the school to protect children and create policies that are in the best interest of the well-being and growth of all children during the instructional day.

 

All web-enabled devices  have the potential to access content online including images, video, and text, with or without cellular connectivity. These devices include cellular phones, tablets, personal computers/chromebooks digital music players and Android and iOS watches.  It has become imperative that schools establish guidelines and rules for safe use of technology on campus.

 

Vine Hill Elementary School is including the following in our technology guidelines

 

At Vine Hill School electronic devices may be used only for academic purposes and exclusively by permission of the teacher.  

We recognize that cell phones have become a common tool for communication.  However, they have also become a major distraction to the learning environment, pose a risk to the safety of the user and nearby peers, and are vulnerable to theft.  We ask that you allow your child to carry a cell phone only if absolutely necessary.